What Is An Allele That Is Present But Unexpressed?

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An allele is a variant form of a gene that is present in an organism\’s genetic makeup. Genes, including alleles, are the source of all the genetic information within an organism. Alleles determine the traits and characteristics that an organism has, such as eye color, hair color, and more. Alleles can be dominant, recessive, or a combination of both.

But what happens when an allele is present but unexpressed in an organism? Simply put, an unexpressed allele is one that is present in an organism\’s DNA but is not expressed in the organism\’s physical traits. This can happen for a variety of reasons, such as if the allele is recessive and is masked by a dominant allele or if the allele is not linked to any of the organism\’s physical characteristics.

Examples of Unexpressed Alleles

An example of an unexpressed allele is the allele for tongue-rolling. This is a trait that is determined by a single gene that has two alleles: one that allows you to roll your tongue, and one that does not. If you have the allele for tongue-rolling, you can roll your tongue, but if you don\’t, you can\’t. However, if you have the allele but it is unexpressed, you won\’t be able to roll your tongue.

Another example of an unexpressed allele is the allele for the gene that determines whether an individual is able to taste a certain chemical called PTC. This gene has two alleles: one that allows you to taste PTC, and one that does not. If you have the allele for the gene that allows you to taste PTC, but it is unexpressed, you will not be able to taste PTC.

How Are Unexpressed Alleles Inherited?

Unexpressed alleles can be passed from one generation to the next, just like expressed alleles. When an individual passes on their unexpressed allele to their offspring, the offspring will not express the trait associated with the allele unless the same unexpressed allele is also present in the offspring\’s other parent. This is because unexpressed alleles are recessive and require two copies for the trait to be expressed.

The same is true for expressed alleles. If an individual has a dominant allele for a trait, it will be expressed in their offspring, even if the other parent has a recessive allele for the same trait. In this case, the dominant allele will mask the recessive allele, resulting in the trait being expressed in the offspring.

Are Unexpressed Alleles Common?

Unexpressed alleles are actually quite common. In fact, most individuals have more unexpressed alleles than expressed alleles. This is because most alleles are recessive, meaning they require two copies to be expressed. Since most individuals only have one copy of a recessive allele, the allele is not expressed.

In addition, some alleles are linked to physical characteristics that are not readily observable. For example, some alleles are linked to diseases or other medical conditions that are not always visible. In this case, the alleles are present, but they are unexpressed because the associated trait is not visible.

Conclusion

An allele that is present but unexpressed is one that is present in an organism\’s DNA but is not expressed in the organism\’s physical traits. Unexpressed alleles are quite common and can be passed on from one generation to the next. Unexpressed alleles are usually recessive and require two copies to be expressed. If an individual has a dominant allele for a trait, it will be expressed in their offspring, even if the other parent has a recessive allele for the same trait.

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