Exploring Chapter 6 Of Lord Of The Flies

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Published in 1954, William Golding’s novel Lord of the Flies is widely regarded as a classic of English literature. In it, the author tells the story of a group of schoolboys who are stranded on a desert island after a plane crash and left to fend for themselves. The boys face a number of challenges as they attempt to survive with no adult supervision, and the novel examines themes such as the inherent evil of human nature and the loss of innocence. In this article, we’ll explore the sixth chapter of Lord of the Flies to gain an understanding of the events that take place and how they contribute to the overarching themes of the novel.

The Chapter Begins with a Hunting Expedition

The sixth chapter of Lord of the Flies begins with the boys embarking on a hunting expedition. Ralph, Jack, and Simon set out in search of food, and they take a number of the other boys with them. On the journey, they come across a wild pig which Jack is determined to kill. He throws his spear at the beast, but it only wounds it. The pig runs off, and the boys give chase. As they hunt, Jack and his hunters become engulfed in a kind of wild frenzy, and they eventually catch and kill the pig.

The Beast Becomes a Symbol

The wild pig that the boys kill becomes a symbol of the evil that lurks within themselves. By embarking on the hunt, the boys have tapped into a primal and savage instinct. They have become wild and barbaric, no longer the civilized schoolboys that they once were. The pig’s death is a symbol of the darkness that lies within the boys’ hearts, and it serves to emphasize the novel’s theme of the innate evil of human nature.

The Boys’ Celebrations

The boys’ celebrate their successful hunt with a feast and a dance. They are overcome with joy, and they forget their troubles and anxieties in the heat of the moment. This scene serves to show the reader how easily the boys can slip back into a state of joy and innocence, and how quickly they can forget the darkness of their actions. It also serves to emphasize the theme of the loss of innocence, as it shows how quickly the boys’ can transition from being civilized and orderly to wild and chaotic.

Ralph’s Growing Disillusionment

Ralph is increasingly disillusioned with the boys’ behavior, and he finds himself unable to join in on the celebrations. He begins to feel disconnected from the other boys and is overwhelmed with a sense of loneliness and despair. This serves to show the reader how Ralph has changed over the course of the novel, and how his idealistic hopes for a civilized society on the island have been replaced by a sense of hopelessness and despair.

Jack’s Increasing Power

The hunt and the celebrations serve to show the reader how Jack is becoming increasingly powerful. He has taken on the role of leader amongst the boys, and his influence is growing. This serves to show the reader how Jack is becoming the “Lord of the Flies”, and how his influence is beginning to outweigh Ralph’s. It also serves to emphasize the novel’s theme of the power of fear, as Jack is using fear to control the other boys.

The Return to the Beach

The chapter ends with the boys returning to the beach. As they make their way back, Ralph is consumed by a sense of hopelessness and despair. He is unable to understand why the boys have chosen to follow Jack’s lead, and he is unable to comprehend why they have embraced the darkness within themselves. This serves to show the reader how Ralph’s idealistic hopes have been replaced by a sense of disillusionment and despair.

Conclusion

The sixth chapter of Lord of the Flies is an important one, as it serves to show the reader how the boys are becoming more savage and barbaric, and how they are embracing the darkness within themselves. It also serves to show the reader how Jack is becoming increasingly powerful, and how Ralph is becoming increasingly disillusioned. Through this chapter, the reader gains a deeper understanding of the novel’s themes of the inherent evil of human nature and the loss of innocence.

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